Celery Root & Apples. Who Knew!?

Here I go, comparing apples and celery root again.
Here I go, comparing apples and celery root again.

Signing up for produce delivery from Full Circle is really paying off! I’m being introduced to veggies I didn’t even realize existed. I mean seriously, who’s ever heard of celery root?

A quick Google search reveals that many of you out there have, in fact, come into contact with the weird, knobby root. (OK, so I’m the only one without a clue…)

Celery root, also known as celeriac, is rich in several vitamins and minerals, including riboflavin, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, vitamins A, C, B6, E, and K—making it a powerhouse food for runners. (We need all of those nutrients for endurance and muscle recovery!)

Slice away the outer layer of celery root to find a fleshy, white center that tastes like celery. (No surprise there.)
Slice away the outer layer of celery root to find a fleshy, white center that tastes like celery. (No surprise there.)

All you’ve got to do is eat it—raw or cooked, to reap the health benefits. One recipe idea: Create a slaw of matchstick-sliced celery root and apple, and toss it with mustard vinaigrette.

I whipped up a quick dressing (1/4 cup of olive oil, 2 tbs. white vinegar, and a good squirt of spicy brown mustard), and then got to work hacking off the outer layer (peel? rind?). The inner flesh turns brown almost immediately when it hits the air—a process known as oxidation, but throwing it in a bowl with the vinaigrette ASAP helps keep it looking fresh. Several minutes of chopping later (talk about an arm workout!), I had a tasty salad.

Celery root and apple slaw with mustard vinaigrette and walnuts—yum!
Celery root and apple slaw with mustard vinaigrette and walnuts—yum!

I added walnuts for a hit of protein, and the next day I dumped the leftovers in a blender with a splash of almond milk and made a smoothie. Who knew celery root was so versatile? (OK, you knew…)

 

Know any good celeriac recipes? What’s the strangest thing you’ve eaten this week?

What The Heck Do You Do With Baby Turnips? This.

Soft and tangy, baked baby turnips are perfect in a dinner salad.
Soft and tangy, baked baby turnips are perfect in a dinner salad.

In my first box of produce from Full Circle I found eight teeny, tiny turnips—the smallest ones I’d ever seen! There weren’t enough of them to star in their own main or side dish, so I decided to get a little creative.

I trimmed the stalks, tossed the roots in a marinade of fresh-squeezed blood orange juice, olive oil, cilantro, and pepper, and then popped them in the oven for about 40 minutes (covered, 375 degrees). After baking, I sliced up the baby turnips and added them (marinade and all) to a salad of green leaf lettuce, roasted chicken (remnants from dinner a couple nights earlier—yum!), apples, peas, avocado, almonds, and more cilantro. The result was muy delicioso, and I discovered that salads are great for stretching a small amount of veggies and using up leftovers.

Need some convincing to go to all this trouble for a couple of midget turnips? Consider this: Turnips are chock full of vitamin C, an antioxidant that fights free radical cell damage and aids in the absorption of iron. Many runners are deficient of this important mineral, and pairing turnips with protein (like chicken) can improve your body’s uptake of iron.

Have you ever tasted a baby turnip? Think you’ll try one now?