I Cried “Wolf!” with React Mobile (And The Response Was Awesome!)

I took this selfie on St. Joe's trail. Most of my runs are solo. I always carry my phone, and React Mobile adds another layer of safety and security.
A selfie on St. Joe’s trail. Most of my runs are solo. I always carry my phone, and React Mobile adds another layer of safety and security.

I recently heard about a cool new app targeted to runners called React Mobile that allows a select group of family and friends (or your entire Facebook community, if you’d like) to track your whereabouts. In an emergency situation, you can simply tap your smart phone screen and an alert message is sent out along with a map pinpointing exactly where you are.

The system sounded a little awkward to me at first. I’m supposed to pull my phone out of my waist belt, log in to my home screen, find the app, and then tap it? Precious minutes would tick by, allowing an attacker to do his damage and get away. But after playing around with it a bit, I realized it’s a very simple and effective process. You start the tracking function, “Follow Me,” at the beginning of your run, and the app is ready to go if and when you actually need it.

The React Mobile home screen is very user friendly—one tap is all it takes to ask for help.
The React Mobile home screen is very user friendly—one tap is all it takes to ask for help.

The first time I activated React Mobile I was sitting safely at my desk. Within seconds, my Dad called from across the country asking if he needed to book a flight, and my cousin texted from across town to let me know she was loading the babies into the minivan and coming over to help. Oops—I really should have warned them ahead of time that this was only a test. I also should have figured out how to turn the alarm signal off before activating it. (Here’s a video explaining how to do that and more.)

All in all, this app is great! I felt super safe—not to mention super loved—and I recommend it for anyone who runs unpopulated trails or paths alone. Oh, did I mention React Mobile is free? Go get it already!

Have you tried React Mobile? What helps you feel more secure when you’re running alone? 

What To Pack For A Trail Run (Hint: It’s Not The Kitchen Sink)

This stuff comes with me on every trail run.
This stuff comes with me on every trail run.

I’m an efficient suitcase packer. I keep it simple, only bring the essentials, and make sure everything fits neatly into the overhead bin. But when it comes to packing for a nice little run in nature, I have an overwhelming urge to load my backpack with all kinds of “might needs” and “just in cases”— like a headlamp (even though I only run trails in daylight) or a poncho (it never rains here in Silicon Valley!). In an effort to cut weight, I’ve forced myself to come up with this barest-of-the-bare sundries list that acknowledges my paranoia but doesn’t indulge it too much.

The North Face Enduro Pack Hydration Pack Better than a bulky backpack, The North Face Enduro Pack was worth every penny. It comes with a bladder to store my water, and the small size forces me to fill the pockets wisely.

Badger Sport Sunscreen CreamSunscreen Burns, brown spots, skin cancer—no thanks! I apply SPF head-to-toe before leaving the house, and then every two hours when I’m in the sun. I like this Badger Sport Sunscreen Cream SPF 35, because it blocks out both UVA and UVB rays, and it’s 100% certified natural.

Cortizone 10 Poison Ivy PadsPoison Ivy Pads The best way to avoid a painful rash is to steer clear of over-grown paths. Still, contact happens. Last summer Michael K. Farrell stood knee deep in 3-leaf itchiness—these single-use Cortizone 10 Poison Ivy Relief Pads would have been super helpful.

GU for the trailEnergy Gel I’ll suck down a GU on runs lasting more than an hour, but I usually carry four with me on the trails—you know, in case I get lost and need a “meal.” (GU Peanut Butter is still my fave flave.)

Toilet paper in a baggieToilet Paper Mother Nature doesn’t always provide this for you. I bring mine in a baggie, and I pack it back out with me to a garbage can if I end up using it.

The North Face Women's Verto JacketLight Jacket Shady woods and Bay Area winds can make temps drop fast, so I keep The North Face Women’s Verto Jacket handy—it scrunches up (hence, all the wrinkles) into its own pocket! It also happens to be water resistant in case of pop up showers. (Seriously, this fear is unfounded. Weather.com shows a 0% chance of precipitation around here most days.)

I also carry along my cell phone, sunglasses, and car keys—those are necessary for actually getting me to the trailhead and then home again.

Am I missing anything important? What do you pack for outdoor runs?

Tell the Boss I’m Not Coming In—It’s National Running Day!

Happy trails! I'm celebrating National Running Day in Almaden Quicksilver County Park.
Happy trails! I’m celebrating National Running Day in Almaden Quicksilver County Park.

I’m my own boss, so I don’t really have anyone to answer to if I decide to slack off work for the afternoon and go for a run—which is exactly what I’m doing today.

National Running Day is the best day of the year to be a runner! With organized group runs around the country, there are tons of opportunities to celebrate with others who love the sport. Or to introduce your passion to someone new—take a friend out for an easy jog around the neighborhood!

It’s also a great day to reevaluate your running goals for the rest of the year. The chill of winter kept you inside, spring got you back into your running groove, and now that it’s summer you owe it to yourself to set some goals! Maybe it’s time to add more miles, toss in a weekly track workout, or sign up for a fall race. The options are endless, so have fun deciding how to challenge yourself next!

My plan for the second half of 2013 is to keep up the momentum. I’m super excited for a weekend of racing at the end of this month: Pretty Muddy 5K in Sacramento, Saturday Jun 29, and Sharks Fitness Faceoff 10K in San Jose, Sunday June 30. Then, I’ve got a half-marathon on the calendar in mid-July. I’d like to race in the fall, and I’m waffling between registering for another half-marathon or going all out and doing a full 26.2.

Scheduling work and personal life around a half-marathon is a lot easier than fitting in marathon training. Still, I’m pretty sure the boss would be OK with me taking a day off here and there to squeeze in extra miles or rest. Decisions… Decisions…

How are you celebrating National Running Day? What’s your running plan for the second half of 2013?

Tryin’ To Catch Me Runnin’ Dirty?

The Wildcat Loop Trail at the Rancho San Antonio Open Space Preserve offers a little bit of everything—meadows, woods, single-track, and plenty of climbs.
The Wildcat Loop Trail at the Rancho San Antonio Open Space Preserve offers a little bit of everything—meadows, woods, single-track, and plenty of climbs.

It felt like spring in Northern California on Sunday—with clear, sunny skies and temperatures creeping up to the mid-60s, so I decided to celebrate the incredible day with a trail run in the Rancho San Antonio Open Space Preserve. (I googled “best trail runs near San Jose, CA” and this one was at the top of the list.)

Looking pretty while getting dirty!
It got warm out there in the woods, so I stripped down to my pink t-shirt, which just so happens to match my sunglasses. Looking pretty while getting dirty—love that!

A short, 25-minute drive from where I live, the preserve boasts more than 23 miles of trails for hiking, biking, and horseback riding.  The website said the Wildcat Loop Trail was great for running, and it wasn’t kidding! I got in a fantastic 3-mile workout (plus the warm up and cool down jog from the car to the trailhead) and counted several other runners burning up the track out there, too.

Pretty Muddy $10 OffOn a high after running on dirt, I signed up for another messy kind of experience when I got home. I’ve been invited to join Team Pretty Muddy and participate in the Pretty Muddy 5K in Sacramento, CA on June 29. This will be my first obstacle mud run ever—and I’m psyched to be able to share the experience with you. But instead of just reading along, I’d love for you to join me! You can get $10 off the registration fee if you sign up by March 1. Click to it already!

Did you discover a new trail this weekend? Have you ever done a mud run?

Goodbye, New York City!

Running with my Achilles buddy Jim. He made running feel important.
Crossing the finish line of the 2007 NYC Half Marathon with my Achilles buddy Jim. My heart (and hair!) has grown a lot since then.

My gluteus medius injury is almost healed and I should be out there in Central Park getting my road legs back. But I’ve been avoiding it. Not because it’s cold, or because I’m scared it will hurt, but because I’m afraid I’ll cry. I’m not running because I know when I head to Central Park for a run, it will be my last.

Michael K. Farrell and I decided it’s time for a life shake up, so we’re moving across the country to San Jose, CA. It’s exciting! I’ll have a new city to explore and there will be new roads (and trails!) for my sneakers to fall in love with. I’m eager for the adventure, but moving is bittersweet.

I’ve spent more than a decade here in the Big Apple. This is where I became a “real” runner. I completed my first half marathon here with my visually-impaired buddy Jim. Guiding him around Central Park, through the streets of Times Square, and down the West Side Highway in the New York City Half Marathon gave my running meaning, and a sense of purpose. (The New York chapter of Achilles International has been my family ever since.)

I did my first 26.2 here, too. There’s nothing like running through Brooklyn, Queens, up the streets of 1st Avenue to the Bronx, and then back into Manhattan to Central Park—it’s magical.

Kim NYC Marathon Finish
All smiles at the finish of the 2009 ING New York City Marathon.

Yes, I’ll come back to visit—and I might even do a familiar 6-miler, but it won’t be the same. The city will feel different, foreign, and I will suddenly be one of those wide-eyed tourists that all New Yorkers love to hate. It makes me a little sad. But with sadness, there always comes a glimmer of hope.

Farewell, New York. I’m off to make a brand new start of it somewhere else.

Bear Mountain Half Marathon Recap: The Camera Loves Me!

Politely jockeying for position at the start of the race.

Have you ever been in one of those races where everything just goes right? The conditions are perfect. You’re solidly trained. The weather couldn’t be better. The course is a dream. Well, The North Face Endurance Challenge Half Marathon in Bear Mountain, NY wasn’t one of those races. But the photos of me participating in it would certainly lead one to believe otherwise. (What can I say? The camera loves me!) Still, I have to admit those smiles were 100% genuine. I loved this event!

The morning started out in a bit of a panic. Our GPS device sent us to the wrong address and we ended up on the wrong side of Bear Mountain. (All together now: “The bear went over the mountain, to see what he could see!”) Luckily, we planned to be at the start 45 minutes early, so we had time to correct the mistake. It took 22 minutes to drive west, find the right exit, and get to the parking lot—and I was an anxious mess.

The laid-back start line was nerve-soothing. Unlike road races where directors line you up in corrals based on your pace, this was a free for all. Runners casually milled about in a grassy area in front of an inflatable archway that demarcated the start/finish. Instead of feeling like we were about to embark on the toughest trail half marathon in the region, the atmosphere was as calm as a backyard barbecue. Thank goodness—after the hectic drive, I couldn’t have handled a stressful line up.

Early miles were no indication of the intensity to come. I got into a decent mid-pack position within the first two miles, knowing that the trail would turn to single track soon and I wouldn’t be able to easily make passes after that. From there, the course wound around through the woods, progressively getting steeper, the ground changing from dry to muddy, and the terrain becoming increasingly treacherous. I was prepared for roots, rocks, and the occasional branch across the trail, but there were sections of this course that we were simply unable to “run.”

Lively conversation made the death-march climbs bearable. There’s an unwritten code among trail runners that if you can’t see the top of a hill, you stop running and walk up it instead. My signature is all over that imaginary document! Hiking up the inclines that make the Bear Mountain course a five-out-of-five for overall difficulty and a five-out-of-five for technical terrain, would have been daunting had I been alone. But chatting with the girls just behind me made the climbs fly by. (Have you ever seen people hiking with a pair of caged pet birds? One of these girls had! Hilarious!)

Minutes after taking a tumble—you can just make out the bruise beginning to form on my lower left quad.

Wiping out hurt, but I kept going. With a little less than three miles to the finish, the trail opened up and I found some speed. It felt good to pump my legs harder. But at that point I was mentally fatigued, and I wasn’t concentrating enough on where I was planting my feet.  I hit a rock in the center of the path and went flying, crashing hard onto my left side. Momentum and a slight decline caused me to roll forward, so I ultimately finished the fall on my back with my head pointing down the trail. I got back onto my feet a little dazed, and started moving forward immediately. A man in front slowed to make sure I was okay—I was, mostly. A guy behind clapped and shouted, “You’re doing great! Your pace has been even this entire time and you’re almost to the finish.” I shouted my thanks to both of them and went back to a slow jog.

Working the camera and crossing the finish line mats—all in a day’s work.

My heart soared when I heard the cheers at the finish line. “Finish strong with a smile,” is a mantra that I use during the last mile of every race. And it was especially helpful for this one. Half a mile from the finish my body was starting to realize that it was in pain—from the fall and from the intense workout that I’d just put it through. I came out of the woods onto a parking lot that stretched towards the grassy field where the journey began, and I started to sprint. I was done, and I was happy.

And I can’t wait to do it all again next year!

Have you ever fallen during a run? What helped you get back up?

 

Guess Who’s Not Feeling Ready for Her Half Marathon Next Weekend?

My mind isn’t there yet, but at least my feet will look confident in The North Face Single Track Hayasa sneaks!

Surprise, it’s me. (Not really a big shock there, huh.) Between stressing out over work for the past month and coming down with a chest cold (gotta thank the boyfriend for that one—every time he gets on a plane he comes back with the sniffles!), I’m not feeling super confident going into what should be a taper week for the upcoming The North Face Endurance Challenge Half Marathon at Bear Mountain. But thinking back on every single significant race I’ve ever participated in, I’ve never felt ready.

The morning I toed the line in Hopkinton for the 2011 Boston Marathon, I was full of dread—I didn’t think I could handle the hills. Minutes before the gun went off for the 2010 Marine Corps Marathon I briefly considered crossing the barricades, finding my dad in the crowd, and telling him to drive me back home—I wasn’t sure if I had put in enough mileage. And in the first mile of the 2009 NYC Marathon I almost pulled over to throw up on the Verrazano Bridge—the anxiety over not being positive that I could complete 26.2 miles was making me nauseas.  I finished all of those marathons. Clearly, my body was ready and this is all mental.

Still, going into my first ever trail half-marathon presents new hurdles for my head. Did I run enough on actual trails to prepare my legs, ankles, feet, tendons, and muscles for the inconsistent terrain? Should I have practiced carrying my water bottle more? Was my training enough? Am I enough?

My mantra for this week leading up to the race: “Yes, I am enough.” I have no doubt that I will finish all 13.1 of those woodsy miles on Sunday 6 May. It just might not be pretty. And I might be sniffling on the way home.

What helps boost your pre-race confidence? Got any trail running tips? 

Pre-Flight Entertainment: Run While You Can Documentary

T-1.5 hours until I leave for the airport. I’m packed. I’m full of sushi (probably won’t see that for the next 6 weeks!). And I’m killing time watching this film trailer. Hello, motivation!

I’ll be wearing my trail running shoes on the plane tonight, which means they’ll be on my feet when I arrive in Nepal on Friday morning. (Yep, it takes a day and a half to get there.)… After watching Sam Fox try to break the speed record for running the Pacific Crest Trail to raise awareness and money for The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (in honor of his mother who suffers from the disease), I’m temtped to run portions of the trail on my Himalayan trek. I’ll let you know how that goes.

In the meantime, you can go out and do great things on your run today! “You don’t have to be given an opportunity, you just have to believe you’re capable of something, and then go after it and give it a try,” says Fox. Find out more about his journey at runwhileyoucanfilm.com.

What inspires you to run? 

My Legs Are In A Funk

The Boston Marathon was over a month ago, but my legs still haven’t completely bounced back. They feel heavy and achy after an easy run, and I’m just not getting quality miles out of them. Maybe I didn’t give them enough rest post 26.2, or maybe it’s all in my head, but I’m feeling a little burnt out.

In her book Run Your First Marathon: Everything You Need to Know to Reach the Finish Line, the late pro-marathoner Grete Waitz wrote, “Recovery from a marathon is both physical and mental.” She went on to say, “If burnout [strikes], take an easy week or two to recover your energy and enthusiasm.” And, “Run some different courses, with different scenery and new people, or, if you feel you can, mix up the times of day when you run. Sometimes even a simple change in a routine can be refreshing.”

I’m taking Grete’s advice—switching it up between pavement and dirt paths, hitting the streets after work instead of in the morning, running with friends, and waiting for the blahs to pass. Until then, I’ll try to gain a little perspective. I run for fun, not for a paycheck. I run for that happy feeling that comes with tackling a tough course. I don’t need to PR every workout; I just need to keep moving. And, even more important, I need to keep smiling.

Are you smiling today? How are your legs feeling? 

Originally posted in Running With It on Shape.com.

Trail Running: Between A Walk And A Hard Pace

I recently put my new Brooks Cascadia 6 trail shoes to the test on a segment of the Appalachian Trail in Bear Mountain, NY, and I’ve got to say, I’m in love. The way the treads grip the ground makes me feel like I can fly down a path without tripping. Still, even with the “right” shoes your next spill is only a loose rock away. Here’s what I learned to help prevent falling when you’re running in the woods:

Look out Your foot tends to land in the spot your eyes are focusing on, so be aware of uneven areas and gnarly roots that might trip you up. When you want to view the scenery, stop and take a break.

Use your arms Hold them out and slightly away from your body for balance. And take advantage of trees (like I’m doing in this photo), when going down rocky sections.

Slow down Even ultra-marathoners will admit to walking super-steep uphill sections and treacherous slopes. In fact, seven-time winner of the Western States Endurance Run Scott Jurek once told Runner’s World speed isn’t all that important to his sport: “Experienced trail runners cover about six miles an hour.” (For comparison, pros tend to run the same distance in road races in just under 30 minutes.)

Buddy up Bring a friend with you when you hit the trails. Not only is it more fun to share the adventure, it’s safer too since there will be someone to run ahead and get help if you become seriously injured.

Have you ever fallen on a trail? Got any advice for staying up right? 

Originally posted in Running With It on Shape.com.