All The Runners In The House Say, Om!

I haven’t been running much, so it’s been a while since I’ve posted. (Have you missed me? I’ve missed you!) I took some time off to finally clear up that lung infection, and now I’m slooowly getting back into my old routine.

I’ve been relying heavily on cross training during my comeback tour, focusing on getting my cardio fitness level back up with spin classes and strengthening weak areas of my body.

Yesterday, I took a yoga class with Lisa Priestly at AS ONE. And today I feel like a new runner. (Albeit a little sore in the back and shoulders—all those downward dogs add up!)

AS ONE, a fitness center run by George Vafiades (Ironman athlete and USA Triathlon Level 1 certified coach) and Mark Merchant (founder of ALTA Physical Therapy and a 2011 Death Race participant), offers up a program of high-intensity training that builds strength, stamina, and flexibility over an 8-week period. It’s perfect for runners, triathletes, and others looking to get stronger and faster, and to circumvent injury and muscle imbalance.

Lisa guided the class through a series of hamstring stretches and hip opening poses that left me feeling limber. And she explained that yoga is the perfect companion to cardio and strength training, because it lengthens muscles, opens up joints, and works the kinks out of other tight spots. I’m sold—again.

I’ve talked about yoga before, but I’m certainly guilty of skimping on the stretching—I mean, who hasn’t heard me whine about my hip flexor? So it’s time to do something about it. I’m heading out now to tackle a few miles in the park (running again feels so good!), and before I go I’m rolling out my yoga mat. This way it’s ready for a quick toe-touching session when I get back!

Do you stretch regularly? How often do you incorporate yoga into your routine? 

Beyond Base Camp: My Mt. Everest And Annapurna Circuit Adventure

Trying to sum up 34 days of trekking in the Himalaya is pretty tough, which is why it’s taken me almost two weeks to write this post. The actual hiking wasn’t too difficult—if you can run, you can walk up (and down!) a few thousand meters. It was dealing with everything else along the journey—cold sleeping accommodations, cold showers, cold travel companions—that often proved challenging. Still, I managed to smile more often than not and I will always remember this trip as one of the best things I’ve ever done in my life. Here are a few note-worthy memories:

Bonding at 17,598 feet

Picnicking at Everest Base Camp You wouldn’t believe how great a peanut butter sandwich tastes when eaten after tip toeing through a rockslide zone and crossing a glacier. Dining with my FFEs (Friends For Everest’s) made the moment even more filling.

Om mani padme hum

 

Meeting a Buddhist monk Lama Tashi is 96 years old and lives at an altitude of about 4000 meters (13,120 feet) in a monastery carved into the side of a mountain. (Ahem, hill. In Nepal, it’s not a mountain if it’s less than 6000 meters.) He charged me Rs 100 to pray for my trek, and then I gave him another Rs 500 to bless the rest of my life. Best $7.68 I’ve ever spent!

I’ve got my hands full

Counting to five Experts say chatting with locals is the fastest way to pick up a foreign language. So when a couple of little girls decided they needed my help to walk home from school, I took advantage of the opportunity and got them to teach me a few words. I will always think of their smiles when I recite: Ek, Dui, Tin, Cahr, Panc.

Flushed with fever

Catching pneumonia Getting sick overseas might seem like a bad thing, but it really wasn’t that terrible. I learned that even when I have a fever, can’t stop coughing, and might have fractured a rib (the pain was insane!), I could still hike to the next guesthouse… and the next one… and the one three days later. I feel nearly invincible! (Nearly. My body was so wrecked that I slept for four days straight when I finally got home.)

Biking to Bhaktapur File this under: “What was I thinking?” Even though I had been diagnosed with a lung infection and was on medication that warned against operating heavy machinery, I still felt the need to spend my last day in Nepal doing something exciting. After pedaling through rush hour traffic (terrifying!), avoiding potholes the size of elephants on back roads (impossible!), and huffing and puffing my way up some killer hills (spin class doesn’t prepare you for this!), I made it to the medieval town of Bhaktapur. There, I took in views of ancient temples and enjoyed a calm cup of tea. The thought of traveling the treacherous 22 kilometers back to Kathmandu was almost too much, but I channeled my inner NYC bike messenger and completed the round trip.

Now that I’m home, I’m looking forward to lacing up my running shoes and getting back to my normal routine. Stay tuned for more adventures!